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Hello everyone!

Throughout this week we will be discussing a variety of elements in prose writing and this topic is something which isn't just relevant to prose writers, but can be applied to all forms. 

 

Imagine your piece of work is laid out on a stage for people to read. In the seats are the people who you want to read it- who are they? Can you see their faces, imagine their lives? Why have they been drawn to come see your work and read your story? What did you to to keep that audience sat down and interested in your work? Did you think about them when you wrote?

An audience is anyone who could potentially read your work. In writing, we talk about "target audience" and how understanding that audience can help shape the way you write. That intended audience could be specified by age, interests, personalities, cultural background, religion- anything! Of course you may gain readers outside of that target group, but considering your audience will involve your reader in the writing process.

 


But my audience is everyone! :stare:


Considering your reader can help with the decision making process of your writing. You're more likely to choose words based on that person's potential vocabulary, you may define your characters to act in a way your target audience could react to and connect to. You can challenge your reader, push them and have fun with them all through your writing. 

If you don't have that audience in mind, your work may miss that element of connection and generalise your writing and might in the long run alienate your reader. The more real you make your reader, the more likely your success.

Some tips on considering audience in your writing:


  • When you ASSUME you make an "ASS of U and Me". Don't make assumptions that your audience knows what you know, even if they are your peers. Do a bit of research into that target audience and find out more about them.
  • Hook them from the start. We don't need a twelve page description of a vast and wide city that holds many dark alleyways and secrets governed by a tyrant who hates kids. 
  • Will this subject interest them? Be honest and consider your demographic- are 30 year old career women going to read about a boy who likes football stars? Be realistic about your aims.
  • Put yourself in the reader's position. Try putting yourself into the mind of your reader and pretend you have no prior knowledge to your story. Is it clear? Are you feeling connected and engaged to the story?
  • Don't forget about tone! If the story is for five year olds, don't write with a dark tones- consider your language choices, your pace, and voice.
  • Ask yourself regularly "Who am I writing this for?" and keep re-iterating the point


A Game!


 

Below I am going to give you some audiences! You have to give me in return a one sentence plot of a story or poem about what you could write for them. Ie. 

:bulletorange: "A group of middle class equestrian enthusiasts who read "horse riders weekly"" 
Answer: A poem about the grand national from the grand stand perspective


1. Boys who hate their parents and are happiest spending all night on call of duty.
2. Commuters who spend 30 mins on the train early morning and late evening.
3.  Teenage girls who are into Science and engineering.
4.  A retired lady who goes on several coach trips a year.
5.  A hungover college student
6.  A Chinese  immigrant to the UK
7. Youths in juvenile detention facilities
8. Openly Gay and lesbian Party animals
9. People who list their religion as "Jedi" on the census
10. Four year old about to start school.
11.  Parents of children with terminal illnesses
12. Middle Aged Shark Enthusiasts
13. Young women who love everything fake (nails, hair, bags etc)
14.  Chocoholics
15. A new dad-to-be

Feel free to add one on the end for others to play with your suggestion too!


So in conclusion; Audience is a big element to your writing. Keep your demographic in mind and think how that could shape and change the way you approach your work. 


 








Considering your audience is an essential part of writing! Join us for a PE week on Prose basics and support us by commenting and faving the articles! :heart:
Add a Comment:
 
:iconmightymog:
Mightymog Featured By Owner Jan 30, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I've tried to come up/find some examples of my plot line just for a comparison.

1) Online players that manage to find then explore a bug which reveals the players future. simple-ish writing not too complicated.

2) A story about a commuter who gets on the wrong train and is given the chance to live someone else's life. Short chapters make it easy for short reading bursts.

3) An adventure, sci-fi, romance for teens about a girl who meets a boy who is either from the future, another reality, another civilization or another planet. A little like the "chaos walking" series

4) Story of two middle age people who keep coincidentally meeting on their holidays. Gives details on their holiday surroundings and cultures.

6) An illegal immigrant running from the law for being wrongly suspected and manages to find an apartment with a kind roommate...

7) young offenders given the opportunity to make a new life but working for a secret division in the FBI. A bit like "Storm breaker"

9) Friends travelling to a convention and somehow come across never before found manuscripts for their favorite film series. (probably star wars) involves comedy but with witty film references. A tiny bit like "Paul"

10) simply written story about a little girl and a talking teddy bear that stops her fear of going to school.

11) Story about a little girl who adopts an imaginary friend which makes the parents concerned. written from parents point of view.

12) Undersea facility focused on the monitoring of sharks that discover a mutation in a specific species and try to track down why. A little like "Deep Blue Sea"

13) A story about two sisters who open their own beauticians and fall in love with the same boy.

14) I'm thinking the plot to "chocolat" a romance about a woman who's opened a chocolate shop, maybe has body issues.

15) A story about a man who's marriage is splitting up and both think they know what's best for the child.
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:iconlytrigian:
Lytrigian Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
1. A story about a boy who gets transported into the world of the video game he's playing, where he levels up and defeats the final boss just in time to be transported back, only to find the real world has suffered an alien invasion and he is now the only one prepared to fight it.

2. A short, inspirational "real-life" article about a person who made a difference in their community.

3. A space opera featuring a young, hotshot female fighter pilot.

4. Traveler's tale about visiting the old cities of the Silk Road.

5. A dirty limerick, set in large type so as to be easy to read through bleary eyes.

6. I wouldn't purport to understand this audience well enough to aim a story at them.

7. Outdoor, real-world adventure. Maybe a Western.

8. Song lyrics that fit a danceable tune. Subject doesn't even matter, but the more suggestive the better.

9. Character-driven Star Wars fanfic. Plot hardly matters.

10. Couldn't do better than Dr. Seuss here, I think.

11. A poem, with the theme that the ephemeral is the most valuable treasure.

12. Jaws, basically.

13. A cautionary tale about identity loss.

14. The Story of Chocolate: From Grove to Godiva

15. A poem of fatherly advice and wisdom.
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:iconmarcoemma:
MarcoEmma Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2014
Thank you so much for this!! :hug: I will do the one I thought of the fastest:

1. Boys who hate their parents and are happiest spending all night on call of duty.

If they picked up a book in the first place, it would probably be about a boy who gets sucked into a video game while he is hiding from his angry parents and must fight for his life.

How did I do? :)
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:iconalphabetsoup314:
alphabetsoup314 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Here were the things I could actually think of something for:

3.  Teenage girls who are into Science and engineering.
I would write an article about really cool phenomena and tech, or stories about real women in STEM careers(Science, Tech, Engineering, Mathematics), both present and past. If I had to write fiction, I would make sure the things that the heroes do are grounded in real science. 

Somewhat off topic, but the key in getting youth interested in STEM careers, especially girls, is to make it relevant to their lives and the things they see and experience. Sure, you can be excited about the topic and all that, but who freaking cares about geological formations when there are so many other, often 'cooler', things they can tune into, like that new boy band, or the latest fashions? I remember hearing a story from a lady who works with volunteers that go out to schools to do science demos that are relevant to the curriculum: 

A couple of the volunteers went to a junior high class and they were doing a mock DNA test. Two girls walk in late, and they looked like the type of girls who couldn't care less about genetics - fake nails, makeup, the latest teen fashions. They asked, "Why should we care?" And the volunteer said, "You ever watch Maury, where they try to find out if this guy's the baby's father? You want to know how they do it?" And without another words, the two girls got in there with everyone else with their pipettes and test tubes. 
4.  A retired lady who goes on several coach trips a year.
Traveller stories detailing cool places to visit, that might be away from the usual tourist destinations. 
5.  A hungover college student
A note that says "You left your stuff at my place." :XD:
6.  A Chinese immigrant to the UK
A story about adjusting to life in a new country, while struggling to maintain a connection to your culture. I would avoid using overly archaic or obscure words. 
7. Youths in juvenile detention facilities
A Story about a kid, just like them, who got into some trouble, just like them, who got out of that life, and into something better. 
9. People who list their religion as "Jedi" on the census
"The Jedi Mind Trick: A practical guide to psychology for non force sensitives" (What? I thought it was funny.) 
10. Four year old about to start school.
They may feel anxious, so I might write a simple story about a kid discovering that it's fun to learn new things and meet new friends. They may not be able to read, but their parents can. 
11.  Parents of children with terminal illnesses
I would write a story about coping with illness and, not necessarily about staying strong, but about being there for the child. 
12. Middle Aged Shark Enthusiasts
A story about researchers who study sharks for a living, spending a lot of time on the ocean chasing and tagging sharks. 
13. Young women who love everything fake (nails, hair, bags etc)
All the beauty magazines ever. 
14.  Chocoholics
A poem describing the rich, sultry feel of a dark chocolate that just coats your tongue in goodness. 
15. A new dad-to-be
A poem about what it means to be a dad
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:iconwinterwolf71:
winterwolf71 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I will work on this!
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer
Come back if you have any thoughts you'd like to share! :D
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:iconwinterwolf71:
winterwolf71 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I will. I am working on my word smithing :) and this looks like a good leason
Reply
:iconkyteglory:
KyteGlory Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014
1. A Rambo spinoff with an homoerotic twist at the end just to fuck with 'em.
2. Something plainly written with natural breaks at about twenty minutes of reading.
3. An adventure in which science and engineering is the (preferably female) protagonist's main tool. 
4.  A series of related but independent murder mysteries.  Or maybe that's just my mum.
5.  Incredibly simple instructions for microwave pizza.
6.  Historical fiction about a Zulu warrior, pre-colonisation.
7. Good role models who aren't lameasses.
8. Porn with Plot, but not too much Plot, and a little bit of fisting.
9. Something campy and so chocked full of nerd references that even the target audience only understands half of it.
10. Nothing.  They can't read.  Draw them a fucking picture.
11.  A vaguely pleasant, fanciful story with absolutely no kids or terminal illnesses.
12. Marine biologist's submarine crashes hundreds of miles offshore and he must journey to safety with only his phlebotinum-powered "being in deep water for long periods of time without drowning or being crushed" suit to protect him.
13. Obligatory Twilight bashing response.
14.  Gay erotica.
15. An instruction manual.
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer
This is a little more like it- especially things like number 2 :)
Reply
:iconjayoshi36:
Jayoshi36 Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
1. nothing. I HATE CoD and typically everyone who adores it.
2. love story (covering any period of time)
3. science fiction (possibly with several additional themes)
4. love story (covering a long period of time)
5. sex story
6. High school story, non risque themes
7. again, nothing. they're better left alone
8. you mean stereotypical furries? I find that offensive, considering I'm actually one! >:( (though it could really be anything, to answer the question)
(or if you mean party people, then it'd probably be a story about drunks)
9. star wars fanfic/ space politics
10. doggy story
11. story about going through hard times and making it through them
12. Jaws story
13. chic-flic story
14. story about losing weight
15. Story about raising children

good grief this did nothing to distract myself from the irl issue I have right now. ;_______________________;

Now, could someone give me advice about how to do this one?

16. someone you're in love with, but she's not aware that you're in love with her
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer
The game isn't about what you hate, it was about thinking more about how to cater to an audience. Maybe try again? :p
Reply
:iconjayoshi36:
Jayoshi36 Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
At the time I was writing this, I was depressed because I was infatuated with a girl, and was trying to find a way to get her attention. However, I didn't know what exactly infatuation was, so I went around thinking I was actually in love, doing a few stupid things along the way to distract myself such as this. (in the end, I never got my feelings across to her, but now I'm pretty glad because of it)

Sorry Becca, I'll try playing more by the rules next time.  :forgiveme:
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:iconintroverted-ghost:
introverted-ghost Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer
16. Just say it. Unless you do, she won't ever know.
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:iconkaizenkitty:
KaizenKitty Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Student Writer
Cool article Becca! Nice that PE Week started. I'll be paying attention this time :D
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer
Excellent, there is lots going on! Make sure you're watching CRLiterature  & projecteducate 
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Some of these aren't plots cause I stank :B

1. A shut-in's guide to getting laid
2. Murderporn
3. A biography of Marie Curie, although maybe with less leukemia.
4. Sex With Kings (it's a real book, it's awesome :P)
5. Spark Notes
6. A basic guide to English pronounciation (seriously, I have the worst time with some of those accents :stare:)
7. Something about entrepreneurial business
8. RuPaul's biography
9. The ultimate Star Trek compendium
10. Beverly Clearly
11. A pesrpective from kids with terminal illnesses, and what they want ot hear
12. The winner's guide to winning
13. A book about how chemicals disrupt your endocrine system and cause cancer
14. A book made out of chocolate. Or with pictures of chocolate. I'm thinking about chocolate.
15. A guide to giving perfect massages for your pregnant wife
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
Go write some murderporn! 

what.

Also 15 should be a bookers prize!
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I was watching the South Park episode about it :lol:

Seriously!
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:iconxadrea:
Xadrea Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Professional Traditional Artist
Wonderful points made here! :clap: especially about assumptions :XD: I made that mistake this past summer. I don't consider myself a writer by any stretch of imagination, but somehow I got a paid internship to write blogs for a company that sold natural remedies (none of them FDA approved, btw). Anyway, the company was split into two entities: the actual corporation where the products were sold, and their own social media website known as the "smart living network." Most of the blogs I wrote were about fashion, but for the last few weeks of the internship we were allowed to write about whatever we wanted. 

One of the topics I chose to write about was Final Fantasy VII, essentially questioning it's status as "the greatest rpg of all time." It's not my favorite game personally, but I do regard it as the greatest rpg of all time (not counting D&D because it's not a video game). 

After I completed the draft and handed it over to the head writers to review, I got my paper back with a TON of slashes all over it (more than the usual grammatical errors). He was actually angry with me because he thought that because I spoke in such detail about the company behind the Final Fantasy games, the storyline of the game, and the year it was released in both Japan and the United States that I was assuming that he was an idiot (I had no idea he himself was an avid gamer, how that translates into me thinking he was a knuckle dragging idiot is beyond me). I had assumed that the audience who would be reading that particular blog would have no knowledge of Squaresoft/enix or even what an RPG was. I neglected the fact that nobody but actual gamers would even think of going into the gaming subcategory of entertainment on the website because most people were more interested in the health news than the entertainment section (which was actually more of opinionated essays about movies, and music rather than a general review or information). 

It was a learning experience I'll say :lol:
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:iconmisslunarose:
MissLunaRose Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   General Artist
Excellent points in this article! :clap: While writing for yourself is a fun thing to do, it's important to remember that you need to cater to your audience's needs and desires if you want your work to be successful.

I'm very much a fiction writer, so I'm going to use premises for fiction.

1. A young man runs away from his controlling parents to find himself in the army and learns to overcome his difficult family life.
2. A man finds a portal in the subway that leads him into a fantastical world filled with adventure.
3.  A young woman realizes that her company's robots are deserting their owners and decides to investigate.
4.  A 60-year-old single woman travels the world in search of adventure and ends up finding true love.
5.  (I have never been hungover and don't understand the experience enough to write for hungover people.)

6.  A Chinese girl learns to assert herself in the UK, enjoying and interacting with the new culture while celebrating her heritage.
7. A young man with supernatural strength tangles with the law before deciding to use his abilities for the public good.
8. An energetic group of friends starts a Gay-Straight Alliance at a ruthlessly homophobic party school.
9. One planet's inept government tries to hide the prospect of alien invasion, and a woman trains citizens in a set of supernatural skills to take out the invading spaceships.
10. A shy little girl faces separation anxiety on the first day of school, only to find a range of fun activities and kind people who make the day enjoyable.

11.  A little girl in Heaven sets off in search of her parents (who are living) and encounters many wonderful places, only to find her grandmother who takes her in and explains that her parents will join them someday; in the meantime, they will have a lot of fun together.
12. (I don't know enough about sharks.)
13. A young spy tails a corrupt politician around the world, using many detailed disguises so she can discover and expose his web of crime.
14. The adventures of a chocolatier (Personally, I don't think I could write for such a wide audience. I'd want at least an age range or something. :grump:)
15. After being fired, a man has to look after his children while his ambitious wife works; while he is initially worried about the exhaustion of working with egocentric, needy little children, he grows to love looking after them and decides to remain a stay-at-home dad.

This was quite the difficult exercise! I definitely didn't understand all of the audiences very well, so I have a feeling that some of these stories wouldn't be as well suited to their audiences as they ideally would. It was fun nonetheless. :)
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Re: #5 - it's very hard to focus on things because your eyeballs are receding inside your skull, and also your insides are dry and sad. :(
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Student Writer
Some good points here. Personally, I don't like to think about actual demographics too much when I'm writing, partly because I think that in itself is assuming a lot about your readers. I read a bit of Young Adult stuff when I was a teenager, but was actually put off by how often the author was basically just shouting "HEY KIDS, I'M HIP AND COOL--LOOK HOW MUCH MY WRITING SPEAKS TO YOU!!!" Admittedly actual novels didn't tend to be that heavy-handed, but there was a lot of stuff my school forced on us (particularly lesson materials, leaflets, careers stuff, that sort of thing) that was just appalling. I think it's more important to keep your audience in mind in order to make sure you're not doing anything that would put them off your work than it is to write the story that every single openly gay Chinese immigrant will want to read on their thirty minute commute.

Also, once you're writing a story for a specific audience (which, if you're aiming to submit to a particular magazine or something, is probably a really good idea), I think it's important to properly understand them, not just pick a story involving stuff you think they'll like. For example, #9 in this game:

A couple of people have already suggested sci-fi/Star Wars stories for the people who put "Jedi" as their religion on the census. I think this is really missing the point. Hardly anybody (possibly even nobody) actually considers "Jedi" to be their actual faith. These aren't Star Wars fans so huge they've adopted a religion from the film. They're jokers. I would bet that they're a mix of Atheists who don't take religion seriously ("Ha ha, it's no more ridiculous than any other religion.") or people of any faith (though again, I think a lot of them will probably be Atheists) who don't take the census seriously ("If enough people do this, it'll make it onto the news, and that'll be hilarious."). I think what these people would like is a funny story first, and a sci-fi story second, ideally involving hilariously incompetent bureaucrats. My guess is that The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy would suit them really well.

Similarly, I don't think the retired holidaymaker in #4 will be particularly interested in poems/stories about coach trips. I mean, she knows all about coach trips already. Chances are she knows all the websites and magazines, and knows how to get a great deal on her holidays. She might even be contributing to review websites or writing a blog about her experiences. Essentially, I think she's all set for coach/holiday related stuff. I think what she would appreciate is something to read on the coach. My guess is that she'll want a solid story based on a familiar formula,--the book's no good to her if she gets half an hour into the journey and realises she hates it--so probably a murder mystery or a romance, possibly a thriller. She'll likely be keen to pick up a book by an author she already knows, so series might go down well (though ideally not anything you have to read in order: I'm thinking Poirot rather than Harry Potter).

It's good to think about your audience. It's good to know who they are. But if you're writing for a retired lady on a coach trip and your first thought is "I know, I'll write about retired women on a coach trip!" then you're not meeting their needs. You're screaming "HEY, OLD LADY, I GET YOU! I LIKE WERTHER'S ORIGINALS AND KNITTING TOO!!!"
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:iconpizzapotatonbacon:
PizzaPotatoNBacon Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2014  Student General Artist
:worship: This is just wonderful.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
And that's why I recommended Star Trek for the Jedi :laughing:
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Student Writer
I never really got into Star Trek, so I don't know whether or not that's a serious match. :slow: The main thing I've picked up from various clips and parodies is that it has either William Shatner fidgeting about a lot, or Patrick Stewart drinking tea, depending on which series you're watching.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It's an asshole match, Trekkies get really pissed if you mix em up with Star Wars and vice versa :lol:

I've seen one episode (really drunk), one movie, and Futurama. Totally counts!
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Student Writer
I've seen two movies, but I imagine they're probably not that much like the series. Serenity definitely wasn't the same as Firefly, at least.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
The old movies don't seem to be that different.
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
The game really was just a generalisation bit of fun the iterate my point, I'd expect people to do a little more into understanding their audience than that :)
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Student Writer
Oh, the game is absolutely fine. :-) It's just that the first, most obvious answer that springs to mind isn't always going to be the best match for the audience. Really, I think the fact that it's possible to have an in-depth look at people's responses suggests that the game is a pretty useful exercise. I'd even suggest posting it in the forum, but I don't know how many new people it would reach--I think virtually everyone who'd see it there is already following Project Educate.
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:iconbrokentales:
BrokenTales Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
You speak much wisdom.
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:icondamonwakes:
DamonWakes Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Student Writer
:bow:
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
i hope this puts and end to "i write for myself" once and for all but i know it won't

YOU ARE NOT YOUR AUDIENCE

:iconbangkillplz:
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
There's been some allusions to that and again I ask, if you're writing for "yourself" why are you showing anyone? People have an audience the moment they share, they need to learn to include them from the start and it will strengthen the way they work!
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:iconraspil:
raspil Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
people just refuse to be honest and this is what happens.  their ego will protect them at any cost.
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:iconbrietta-a-m-f:
brietta-a-m-f Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist

Bravo! <?xml:namespace prefix = da />Clap Not sure if I'm more excited for the article or that PE Week has finally begun!

 

Ok! For the exercise!

1. A recounting of what really happens while they are sleeping during the day (the parents are playing the video games!!)

2. A story based in a land far away from humdrum existence of their work-a-day lives

3. Doctor Who fanfic

4. Articles on the hip and trendy to remain connected to the younger generations

5. The flyer for the next big party on campus

6. Books on travel or the history of the area they chose to live

7. Poetry that describes the necessity of "sticking it to the man"

8. Books on how to throw the BEST gender-bender themed house parties

9. Anything pertaining to Star Wars, or new age religious material

10. Books with more pictures than words

11. Fantasy or escapist stories to read to their children to district both the the kids and themselves from the tragedy at hand

12. Articles on marine biology or memoirs of shark divers

13. Reviews of the various brands to choose from to make sure they have just the right touch of realism to all the fakeness

14. A cozy mystery themed on chocolate

15. Anything and everything related to raising a child

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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
Love the first one :lol:
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:iconbrietta-a-m-f:
brietta-a-m-f Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
:D
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:iconladybrookecelebwen:
LadyBrookeCelebwen Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I think there's a reason that my audience is quite narrowly tailored. I stared at most of those and realized I'd have no idea where to even begin writing. I mean some of them are easy, others are can I jump off a bridge instead of writing for this audience please. :lol: 
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
It was just a bit of fun, wasn't anything serious so never mind :)
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:iconladybrookecelebwen:
LadyBrookeCelebwen Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It was fun! I just realized quickly that it was impossible for me to do some of them. :) 
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:iconconquerorquixote:
ConquerorQuixote Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Project Educate Game..

1. A story about an alien invasion where the aliens kidnap all the parents (have they done that already?).
2. A poem about the sights and sounds from a train in the wee hours of the morning.
3. A story about a romantic escapade between two astronauts.
4. A poem about how coaching youths keeps you young.
5. A story about the dangers of drinking and driving.
6. A poem about The Beatles preferences in Asian cuisine.
7. A story about a drug dealer who spends his life in jail.
8. A poem about HIV awareness.
9. An original story with lasers, rockets ships, and a new age spiritual awakening.
10. A coloring book with the alphabet.
11. A poem about coping with loss.
12. A story about scuba diving paleontologists.
13. A poem about breast augmentation surgery.
14. A haiku about the cocoa bean.
15. A book about raising octuplets.

This was a fun writing exercise, thank you! :)
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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
Interesting choices- Glad you had fun!
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:iconjustmango:
justMANGO Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Those are good answers. I just want to pop in to say that I used to be the commuter who gets 30 mins on the train every morning and every evening. I would hate to read poems about the sights and sounds from a train, no matter the hour. =P I'd much prefer a tome of a novel, preferably as unrelated to the commute and work/school as possible (because commuting to work/school is miserable). :lol:
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:iconconquerorquixote:
ConquerorQuixote Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Hehe.. Oh thirty minutes is not that bad! I used to have to travel two HOURS when I worked in Manhattan; car then bus then subway. If you think the train is bad try riding the downtown six at 9 o'clock in the morning.. packed shoulder to shoulder everyday!! ;) Anyway, thank you for creating that little mini-challenge, I had a good time trying to think of audiences, and seeing as I get no academic exercise from anywhere else, it made my day! :) :)
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:iconxlntwtch:
xlntwtch Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014   Writer

The PE game:


1. An essay for parents and counselors

2. A newspaper article about commuting

3. An outrageous story for them, about a new breakthrough in those fields (or a position at dA)

4. A list of coach itineraries, with travelers' reviews

5. A list of how to cure hangovers

6. A stage play about how the student, the Chinese and "other" handle the UK's reaction

7. Anything--best would be a stage play they can all get involved in

8. Magazine articles about clothes for the liberated

9. Prose about a census taker

10. Prose about what school is like, "what to do if..." -written for to be read to the youngster.

11. Poetry about living each moment fully

12. Magazine articles about adventures in the wild

13. Nothing (kidding); Prose about how to get fake things to stay fake-looking

14. Prose on the pros and cons of a chocolate diet

15. A book about babies and toddlers, not to leave out new mothers


That's it for this game. I didn't think very long and it shows, but it was fun and I hope more do it.


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:iconbeccajs:
BeccaJS Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014   Writer
Haha nothing in there you want to write about? 

The game was just a bit of fun because I clearly don't go out much!
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:iconxlntwtch:
xlntwtch Featured By Owner Jan 22, 2014   Writer

I'll wait and see if inspiration strikes.

And the game was fun. :heart:

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:iconjwu93:
JWu93 Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
This post is about something almost every writer has been told, yet we, as writers, often forget the importance of the target audience. It's a strange concept, isn't it?

I'm receiving conflicting advice on this subject. While, yes, the audience is extremely important when you're writing, other writers like Guy Kawasaki say that the best writing is something that people create for themselves and that the target audience is usually selected later in the writing process. Kawasaki emphasizes the points "Do not write to impress others," and "Your first and most important reader is you." Would you mind shedding some light on this other viewpoint?

Anyway, I absolutely love this post. Very well done.
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:iconneurotype:
neurotype Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It doesn't sound to me like Kawasaki's advice is mutually exclusive with writing for an audience.

There seems to be this misconception that writing for an audience is pandering to an audience. Making your work accessible to the group of people who might enjoy that sort of thing is not the same thing as, say, dumping in an entire love arc you have no interest in because you think it'll sell. (And frankly, when a writer doesn't enjoy their material, it shows.)
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